Creative Mailboxes of Ashland Photo Essay: Part 1

Artistic, Amazing and Unusual Mailboxes

My Grand Prize #1 so far

A combination of creativity and attention to detail sets this mailbox on Voris Avenue apart from the rest. Greg, creator of this mailbox, was working in his garage as I stopped to admire the little cabin that became a mailbox. I told him how much I enjoyed the woodwork, the chimney, even the realistic garden plants on both sides of the cabin. He told me I would also enjoy the inside. Scroll down to see what I saw inside the cabin/mailbox.

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Amazing detail on this home-made Voris Avenue mailbox. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2019)
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Greg, creator of this mailbox, is showing the inside. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2019)
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Can you see the small inhabitant inside, just waiting to take a look at the daily mail? (photo by Peter Finkle, 2019)

Painted mailboxes

So far in my walks around Ashland, I have seen a variety of lovely and creative painted mailboxes. Here are a few. I am sure there are many more for me to discover.

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This Holstein mailbox is at 886 A Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2018)
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These golden spirals on Morton Street caught my fancy. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2018)
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Bright colors cover this Beach Street mailbox. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2018)
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This unusual combination of colors and styles is on A Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2018)
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From a cat to a blue jay, this one on Scenic Drive. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)
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From a blue jay to a lavender color flower on Ray Lane. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)
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Here’s a whole different style of mailbox and flower. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

Unusual mailboxes

These eclectic mailboxes grabbed my attention and brought a smile to my face.

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The unusual railroad engine mailbox on 5th Street, combined with the creative house numbers, is a striking combination. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2018)
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I find creativity in the placement of this mailbox on Alida Street. The colorful yard sale clothing adds to the scene. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)
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I used this photo of mailboxes on upper Beach Street as the lead photo in my very first WalkAshland article, published April 2018. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2018)

My Grand Prize #2 so far

Crafted by metal artist Cheryl Garcia, this is the most sculptural mailbox I have seen in town so far. From bottom to top, there is so much to see. I focused on the critter standing atop the mailbox in my photos. Is “cute” the right word for it? What do you think?

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You can enjoy the creativity of this mailbox, made by Cheryl Garcia, at 354 Helman Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)
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Going in a little closer. Artwork by Cheryl Garcia. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)
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My wife says this is a cat. Do you agree? Artwork by Cheryl Garcia. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2020)

If you enjoyed this photo essay, you will enjoy my “Quirky Sights in Ashland” photo essay. Here is a link.

Quirky Sights in Ashland: Part 1

I hope this photo essay will lift your spirits. See how many you can recognize!
Photo Essay of Funny, Strange, Artistic and Historic Sights & Sites in Ashland.

Now that’s a cool house number
Yes, there really are unicorns in Ashland (on the 4th of July, anyway)

As I walk the streets of Ashland, I am stopped in my tracks again and again by a surprising sight I have never noticed before. This post trades the written word for the visual image. My hope is that these photos will lift your spirits.

Halloween 2009 Ashland – a REAL wiener dog
While we are looking at Halloween quirkiness, we can’t forget the monster spiders.
Here’s an artistic and unusual entry arch, designed by Wendy Eppinger and sculpted by Eric Cislo in 2006. For close-ups of the arch, see below.

Wendy Eppinger’s entry arch at 190 Walker Avenue has an interesting story. She came up with the idea for the dramatic entry to her property, and then started collecting the unusual inset pieces. She found the center skull on Craigslist. The two cat skeletons came via eBay. Eppinger brought the two roosters back home from a trip to Mexico. Finally, the blue circles are from blue Sake bottles, thanks to Kobe Japanese restaurant.

Here is the center of the arch.
Detail number 2 of the arch.
Detail number 3 of the arch.
Now for something completely different. I spotted this critter riding on a car in a motel parking lot.
On the car next to the galactic dinosaur critter was a Southwest airlines critter.
This odd sight is part of the fun of walking Ashland’s alleys.
Here is a happier alley creature.
This fella must be related to the tree-fella in photo above.
I couldn’t resist this clever, loving sign on the admin table at the Growers & Crafters Market.
This is a different kind of sign. It is 101 year old graffiti left by firemen who staffed the 1908 fire station.
I bet many people will recognize the location of this quote from a 17th century Japanese poet.
The location of this one will be more challenging. The quote is much more ancient than the 17th century. If you look closely just above “Say Friend and Enter,” you may be able to read the Elvish that was written on the gates of Moria. This one is for all Tolkien and Lord of the Rings fans.
Since we are now entering Springtime and more hours in the garden (if we have one), this scene should help us move on through our day with a lighter heart.

If you enjoy “quirky,” you might enjoy my article about “The Mystery of the Peerless Hotel Marbles.”