Patterson Street and Poplar Place

Unusual shrub shapes.

Patterson Street and Poplar Place

From Poplar Place to Ann Street.
Cat & Dog who were best friends.
“North of Hersey Street” neighborhood. 
Poplar Place pocket park (say that fast)!

I walked Patterson Street and Poplar Place in by myself in September 2022, and again with my friend Andy Anderson in late October 2022. Andy and his wife Annette live on Patterson Street. Magic was in the air, for during our walk we had multiple serendipitous meetings.

Dog + Cat friendship

Before I show you photos of Patterson Street houses and yards, I would like to introduce you to Lili the dog (whom I met) and Lunar the cat (whom I didn’t meet, because Lunar now lives on the Oregon coast). When Andy and his wife Annette would take Lili on neighborhood walks a few years ago, Lili and Lunar hit it off. For some reason, they became best friends. Lunar was described to me as a cat who looks like “a white tiger with blue eyes.” Check out this photo of them playing together and see if you agree.

Dog and cat friends on Patterson Street.
Lili the dog and Luna the cat were good friends a few years ago. (photo by Andy Anderson)

The “rock lady”

Andy described Kerry, the woman who used to own Lunar, as “the rock lady.” Sure enough, when we got to her house, I saw interesting rocks by the front fence and began taking photos.

Patterson Street rock art.
Here is a small glimpse of the rock collection at Kerry’s house, along with wood and steel. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)

 At that moment, she came out of her front door and engaged us in conversation. First, she enthusiastically showed us a variety of colorful, intriguing rocks she has found during her mountain trail walks in the vicinity of Ashland. Then she pulled out her phone and showed us unique local rock formations. Then I pulled out my phone and showed her a photo I took of the sun shining through a “keyhole rock” on Mt. Ashland. Here are two photos I showed Kerry..

Mt. Ashland keyhole rock with sun shining through.
I call this photo a magical Mt. Ashland keyhole rock (with the sun shining through). (photo by Peter Finkle, 2013)
Mt. Ashland rock formation
Here is the same interesting rock formation on Mt. Ashland. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2013)

We “escaped” from Kerry’s rock enthusiasm after having seen fewer than one-tenth of one percent of her serious rock collection. I am kidding about “escaped,” of course. If you have read many of my photo essays, then you know I love to take photos of rock walls, rock art and unusual rocks that catch my eye. See one more of my rock photos below.

Parker Street rock wall.
Here’s a bonus photo for people who really like rocks, taken on Parker Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)

Patterson Street and Poplar Place location

Patterson Street is part of a compact neighborhood just north of Hersey Street, between Oak Street to the west and North Mountain Avenue to the east. I counted nine street names in the neighborhood as I walked all nine in September 2022. Patterson Street and Clinton Street are the two longest. Poplar Place is the shortest – just a cul de sac off of Patterson Street.

This neighborhood is not “historic” Ashland, nor is it “brand new” Ashland. For example, the houses on Patterson Street were built between the 1930s and the 2000s. 

Poplar Place

From Kerry’s house, Andy walked me to the west end of Patterson Street, a cul de sac with the name Poplar Place. I took photos here of autumn color and a Poplar Place pocket park (say that fast three times).

Fall color at Poplar Place.
My friend Andy Anderson is appreciating the fall colors at Poplar Place in late October 2022. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Poplar Place.
Here is an overview of the Poplar Place cul de sac at the west end of Patterson Street in September 2022. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Three deer on Poplar Place.
Can you see three deer faces? It’s a mother and two fawns walking the neighborhood along with me. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)

The pocket park common space borders Mook Creek, a seasonal stream. Andy and I met and chatted with Jef, who was on his knees at the edge of the creek replacing invasive weeds with native plants. I wrote about Jef as the “stream protector” in my photo essay about Crispin Street. This pocket park has a small play area for children and a picnic table where neighbors can gather. 

Pocket park by Poplar Place
Cross a small bridge to this pocket park by Poplar Place. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Seasonal stream by Poplar Place.
Here’s a view of the seasonal stream by Poplar Place. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Pocket Park by Poplar Place.
Can you see the path heading north from this pocket park by Poplar Place? (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)

Where does this path lead? Learn more about it. Read my photo essay about Crispin Street.

More Patterson Street photos, from west end to east end

view down Patterson Street.
Looking east on Patterson Street from Poplar Place. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Unusual shrub shapes.
Topiary, anyone? Someone had fun pruning these shrubs on Patterson Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Plant shapes on Patterson Street
This close-up shows two of the various plant textures and shapes in this garden. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Attractive door on Patterson Street
I like this simple, attractive entryway and front door at 230 Patterson Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Patterson Street raised bed garden
This is the first time I have seen a raised bed garden on wheels. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Patterson Street fence.
Very unusual multi-level fence at the corner of Patterson Street and Carol Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Quan Yin statue
I have noticed quite a few Quan Yin statues as I walk around town. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Gate on Patterson St
I like artistic and interesting gates. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Oldest house on Patterson Street, built in 1930.
316 Patterson Street, built in 1930, is the oldest house on Patterson Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
Oldest house on Patterson Street.
Another view of the oldest house on Patterson Street. Those big trees look like they were planted in 1930. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
empty lot at the corner of Patterson and Phelps Streets.
There are still a few empty lots along Phelps and Patterson streets. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
360 Patterson Street.
This looks like a large and interesting multi-level house. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)

Two interesting trees

Here are two photos of a Golden rain tree and a close-up photo of a Tamarind tree on Patterson Street. I think these two trees are unusual in Ashland.

Goldenrain tree on Patterson Street.
Goldenrain tree on Patterson Street. (photo by Peter Finkle in October 2022)
Golden Rain tree
Golden Rain tree pods. (photo by Peter Finkle in September 2022)
Tamarind tree
Close-up photo of a Tamarind tree. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)

View of Pompadour Bluff

Andy told me, with a bit of pride in his voice, “This spot on Patterson Street has the town’s best view of Pompadour Bluff.” Others may disagree, but the street trees here do provide a beautiful frame for the geologic formation.

view of Pompadour Bluff
Andy Anderson pointed out this lovely view of Pompadour Bluff from Patterson Street. (photo by Peter Finkle, 2022)
4 Comments
  • Tangerine Bruton
    Posted at 15:35h, 15 November Reply

    Interesting tour. I too love a good doorway and gate. Thanks for your perspectives.

  • Mitch Hrdlicka
    Posted at 09:25h, 08 November Reply

    Thank you yet again for your “Best Of Ashland” (which is anywhere) tour.

  • Carol Case
    Posted at 08:21h, 08 November Reply

    I love your walks and commentary. I hope you will publish a book someday..

  • Andrea Good
    Posted at 18:42h, 07 November Reply

    I didn’t know it was called Pompadour Bluff ! I loved the keyhole picture of Mt. Ashland. Amazing.

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